Antigua Guatemala Food Options — Burritos

Rudy Giron: Antigua Guatemala &emdash; Antigua Guatemala Food Options — Burritos

I don’t remember if I have mentioned it before, but Guatemala has to be the worst place to try Mexican food. You see, the overlap of ingredients among both cuisines is huge and because the majority Guatemalan cooks have never had true authentic Mexican food, well when they prepare it, the food tastes quite Guatemalan if you ask me. Let’s just say, in Guatemalan you can have Guatemalan versions of Mexican food.

Finally in Antigua Guatemala, we can have American versions of Mexican food such as burritos, tacos, quesadillas, etc., such as this green and red sauce wet burrito from El Pinche.

Through the years there had been a few restaurants that got quite close to the true authentic Mexican flavour, especially if the owners or cooks were Mexican, but they come and go.

© 2017, Rudy Giron. All rights reserved.

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  • NYChapin

    Well, I don’t want to start wwwIII, but you can’t get a decent burrito in Mexico either. Rudy, you were recently in the Bay area, did you get a chance to try a burrito from the Mission?

    • Well NYChapin, this is why I mention Guatemalan-tasting and American-tasting Mexican food. Now, having said that. I have had burritos in the northern states of Mexico and as far south as San Luis Potosí. I had only one burrito in Mission District and even though it was good, I had better in Los Angeles.

      • NYChapin

        American-tasting Mexican food in Guatemala, dude you are crazy !

        • You think that’s crazy, how about this? Avocadoes that were originally from Antigua Guatemala are rename California or Hass avocados and because of the demand grown in Mexico are now called Mexican avocados in Guatemala. That’s crazy.

  • Primum Non Nocere

    Rudy the foodie! I’ve never had a burrito overlaid with sauce like that. It is reminiscent of the enchiladas en mole at Playa, in Mill Valley, CA (North of San Francisco.) The chef is Omar Huerta, originally of Jalisco, Mexico. Here’s a shot of that enchilada in progress from our visit last October, followed by one of the completed product from John Storey, “special to the S.F. Chronicle.”

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/5bd716a79fa2cf614cd13ba838fc11c2bdf721513f1bdf4bb071dafc5ae83c6e.jpg
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/8efb28107f7eebd67bad2b672428f1602f0fee204eda9482b3268694a88a0e99.jpg

    I wish I’d known you were in the Bay Area. We would’ve taken you to
    Playa! Or wherever you wanted. Yes, L.A. outdoes us in quantity if not
    quality of Mexican boites, but there are plenty of fine eateries of all kinds in the foodie mecca of the S.F. Bay Area. Let us know the next time you plan a visit. ¡Buen provecho!

    • Oh thanks for the invitation Primum Non Nocere; I will keep that in mind for my upcoming trip. Burritos as shown above are ordered as wet burritos in Southern California; when deep-fried are known as chimichangas. Without the sauce on top are simply known as burritos.