Guateflora — Jade vine

Rudy Giron: Antigua Guatemala &emdash; Guate Flora — Tumbergia Jade

Strongylodon Jade flowers are vines similar to the colorful and strange-looking flowers of a climber plant known locally as Tumbergias (tunbergia misurense is the scientific name). Tumbergias are quite popular in the gardens of La Antigua Guatemala. Tumbergias Jade, on the other hand, are quite rare. Both kinds of tunbergia are very popular with bees and bumblebees because of the amount of nectar these plant produce.

© 2017, Rudy Girón. All rights reserved.

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  • Primum Non Nocere

    Rudy, thank you for the lovely photos. I see that you as well as a hotel there in Antigua (Las Farolas) identify this plant as “Thunbergia (Tumbergia) Jade.” However, it is actually Strongylodon macrobotrys,
    commonly known as jade vine, emerald vine or turquoise jade vine.
    You can Google it.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strongylodon_macrobotrys https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/12ba3e9b8286a5dcc90f04e87df9a0bd8e655361f1ee68de0838f6b342a40144.jpg
    Strongylodon – jade vine – is in the fabaceae or pea family.
    The first photo below is of one of those jade vines in a greenhouse in Canada.

    By comparison, Thunbergia has white or purple flowers. (2nd photo.) https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f73583ba66bde100cef30f2633d260dcc0b581fa4a2f76bc61aa18648b72b839.jpg
    Thunbergia is in the acanthaceae or acanthus (seen on Grecian Corinthian columns) family.

    What the two plants have in common is that they’re both very lovely trailing vines.

    • Thanks Primum Non Nocere, I was told it was tumbergia by the gardener tending the plants, so I assumed he knew. Thanks for the clarification.

  • Ed Brunet

    Thanks so much Rudy for “the cousins of the colorful and strange-looking flowers of a climber plant known locally as Tumbergias” I have wanted to know the name of that beautiful plant from the day I first saw it in Cero Santo Domingo but no one seemed to know. I’ve also seen them in Copan Ruinas but never in Siguatepeque where I live. Qué lastima.