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Arches at Ruins of La Merced

If you haven’t visited the ruins of La Merced, you are missing out in one the most charming and unique ruinas of …

Arches R Us

Here’s a simple photograph of arches captured inside Ruinas de Santa Clara, Antigua Guatemala. Nearly 9 years ago I started sharing with …

Arches at Tanque de la Unión

These arches along with the public washbasins and water tank are one of the most often photographed landmarks in Antigua Guatemala. I …

Arches-R-Us

Now this is what the dry season looks like in Antigua Guatemala; sunshine, deep blue skies, beautiful light, cold winds and almost …

Arches Are Us

El Palacio de los Capitanes building has to be one of my favorites edifices with lots of arches; and you know I …

Arches within Arches

Since Rudy is such a fan of framing I thought I would toss in a few framed shots of my own. Has …

Architectonic Details: Arches

Same as yesterday’s photo, we repeat the repetition theme, but even more so today. Can you tell me what elements repeat in …

Arches, Anyone, Anyone?

Sometimes in your way to work, you just have to stop, take a deep breath and sip from your cup of coffee …

Arches in Sync

An interesting find in La Antigua Guatemala, a town full of arches at every turn; but how often one comes across an …

Arches at the Jocotenango Municipalidad

Here is another shot taken at the Municipalidad de Jocotenango which shows its yellow façade and abundance of arches. Jocotenango was the community where workers and artisans (indians) lived in colonial times. Nowadays, Jocotenango still provides residence to many of the workers of La Antigua Guatemala.

The Three Arches of El Calvario Church

I am glad El Calvario Church provides a nice transition from the white cemetery series back to the rich antigüeño color palette while maintaining the death theme going on. El Calvario or Calvary (Golgotha) is the name of the mount on the outskirts of Jerusalem where it’s believe Jesus Christ was crucified. This church with its three arches provides a symbolic representation of the crucifixion; with each arch representing each cross.

Upside Down Arches

The first time I published the arches reflected on the water tank at Tanque de la Unión Park in La Antigua Guatemala, there were many people who really liked the photo. There were even some Guatemalans who said the reflection was done in Photoshop. Now you can take the statement either way: you can feel proud to know that you’ve snapped a shot that people think you spent many hours in the digital lab of Photoshop or you can take it as a put down on your photo-taking ability. I am glad I am very competent in the Photoshop department, heck I could even argue that I excel in the skills of Photoshop since I started working in version 2 and I use the program in a daily basis.